Learning letter names and sounds

Whether you are homeschooling or have a young child at school, most of us will at some stage be helping our children learn their letter names and sounds. There are many different ways to do this, from rote learning with flash cards to games and hands on workjob style activities.

I use quite a few different methods depending on the child, their rate of learning and preferred learning style and the time I have available to teach them. One of the more hands-on approaches I have employed is an alphabet chart. Again, this is something I made way back in my Uni teacher training days that has been useful through 7 years of teaching and now has made it’s way to the third child in our family.

I do not introduce the letters for the first time using the chart – there are too many all at once and it is too overwhelming. We go through the alphabet one letter at a time, adding more as the child is ready. (I’ll post about this another time.) Once the child knows quite a few letter names and most sounds I introduce the pocket chart. It can be used in many different ways. Here are just a couple:

  • Matching lowercase letters to uppercase letters.
  • lucky dipping letter cards from a pillowslip, naming them, saying their sound and then sliding them into the correct pocket.
  • sorting small objects by their initial sound (first sound you hear when you say the word) into the correct pocket.
  • setting up a word bank system with picture and word cards that begin with each letter “filed” in each pocket for children to use during creative writing.
  • find the hidden toy games where the child checks the pockets for a hidden items and must name the letter and sound to be able to keep the item. (Just for the duration of the game though, although you could include a little treat surprise every now and then.)

These objects are one set I use for initial sound sorting.

A second set of objects for initial sound sorting.

To begin with, all alphabet chart work is done one-on-one with me, however once the child begins to grasp the concept of initial sounds, I give them a bag or box of objects to sort into the correct pocket as an independent activity. It is self-checking because there is never more than one object for each pocket so if they find one already there, they know they have made an error and can self correct.

If you are not able to sew a chart, you could make one using cardboard and add Velcro spots to attach the letter cards or large sturdy envelopes to act as pockets for the items. If you plan to use it for any length of time or with more than one sibling it would be worth taking the time to sew one up. It might be a nice project for Grandma perhaps??

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Mega Marbles: A Montessori style transfer activity

Mega Marble Transfer

This was the first Montessori inspired activity I ever made. I presented it to my now 4 year old daughter when she was a toddler and she absolutely loved it. The large ladle was easy for her to manipulate successfully and the marbles were very attractive to her. She always completed this activity several times before putting it away and it was a favourite for some time. The marbles came from a $2.00 shop, the ladle from my kitchen junk drawer and the tray and wooden bowls from a Good Sammies recycled clothing shop. All up it probably cost me $5.00 and all the materials can be re-combined and used again with other activities.  I would usually present it with the marbles in the left hand bowl to encourage left to right directionality in preparation for reading and writing.

DESCRIPTION:

The child uses the scoop provided to transfer the marbles from one bowl to the other and back again. Materials are replaced as they were found before returning the activity to the shelf.

CATEGORY/SUBJECT AREA:

Practical life

CONCEPT/SKILL:

Fine motor development

Control of ladle

EQUIPMENT & MATERIALS:

Ladle

Large marbles or alternative material to transfer

2 wooden bowls or alternative containers

Tray

Please see my articles titled “Workjobs and Learning Styles” and “Brief Montessori Overview” for more information.