Sensory tub: Animal habitat

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Our latest sensory bin is an animal habitat. This time I had our 3 youngest help me set it up and decide what we should add to it.

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We started with a bunch of tins and boxes for caves and hills and draped a green cloth over the top .

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To our basic landscape we added artificial leaves for trees (old Christmas tree branches work well for this), blue jewels for water, black stones and a bunch of assorted wooden beads – and of course the animals.

You could easily change this idea to a different environment with a different coloured sheet – white for snow, yellow for desert etc. and add the appropriate animals and accessories.

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Apparently finding shelter and lining it with dry leaves so the animals would be warm and comfortable was the priority. We have been watching a lot of Bear Grylls survival DVDs recently and the conversation certainly revolved around his advice. (NB You know you have been watching TOO many Bear Grylls survival shows when your 4-year-old eats an ant, a bug and a daddy-long-legs spider within one week. Yes, I did say eats and yes, we have talked to him about the dangers of doing this and pointed out repeatedly that he is not starving nor in a life or death survival situation!)

 

 

Sensory tub: fun with cars, roads and rocks

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Our latest sensory tub was put together in 5 minutes flat using a bunch of cars, our rocks from the last tub and a basket of blocks that rarely sees the light of day. I replaced the oats sensory activity with cars with the two youngest boys in mind but was surprised to see that the girls also couldn’t keep out of it.

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I just tipped it all in but this is what it looked like after  my 4 1/2 and 9-year-old girls spent 20 minutes setting it up to their liking – I couldn’t have done it better myself!

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Everyone from the 2-year-old to the 11-year-old got in there!

Now, I would like to leave you with the false impression that everyone played together in perfect harmony while I sipped a hot cup of tea and smiled on my angelic brood. Unfortunately the sound track to the seemingly peaceful picture above went something like this:

He’s knocking down my building! Drive on the road! DRIVE ON THE ROADS! MUUUUUUUUM THEY”RE NOT DRIVING ON THE ROADS!!!! Don’t touch my rocks! He’s touching MY rocks! MUUUM, He’s wrecking EVERYTHING! – You get the picture. Pairs seems to be the ideal arrangement for our sensory tubs. Any more than that and the conflict starts.

The previous paragraph has been included for the benefit of some of my friends who operate under the delusion that our family is approaching perfection! 🙂

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This is what it looked liked a couple of hours later.

 

Farm sensory tub – toddler and preschooler fun

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Our rocks sensory tub has been available for a month or so now and interest has waned, so it was time for a change. Within a matter of 10 minutes I had thrown together the farming bits and pieces we have around the place, (most of which were in our playdough toys) resulting in a new and exciting activity to keep my little ones interested and playing quietly during one of the many breastfeeding sessions that now take up much of my day.

Sensory tubs are great for a wide variety of ages (my 2 to 9 year olds LOVE them and even the 11-year-old boy will sit down and have a fiddle) and they are an excellent activity to assign an older child to do with a younger sibling for some brother and sister time. I find pairing the older and younger children means that the youngest learns how to play with the materials and I will often see them imitating the play of their older sibling when using the materials independently later on. I remember being quite surprised to find that my first child didn’t know how to play with some of the activities I gave him. I actually had to sit down and model pretend play with him to teach him what to do. Now, with so many older siblings, I no longer have this role – it is well and truly filled with the modelling of the older children for the younger ones.

A quick trawl of the web or an online site like Pinterest will give you an abundance of ideas and with a few tucked in the back of your mind you can keep an eye out for suitable materials whenever you happen to be out at the local discount store, op shop or supermarket. At the most, these tubs cost me $10 or so in loose materials to fill them (the rocks, pasta, oats, rice base etc.) and I then store these to be re-used in the future, with a different play accessory to keep it fresh. It is well worth the small investment for the peaceful play that results, allowing me to get the dinner cooked or feed our baby without interruption.

Our farming sensory tub includes plastic farm animals, plastic and popstick fences, milk bottle and yoghurt container lids for water holes and food dishes, craft matchsticks (hay), wooden beads (as corn cobs etc.)  plastic logs, wall panels, artificial leaves and the rocks themselves.